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Diego Riccioly
Diego Riccioly

The Ultimate Guide to Teacher Games for Classroom Engagement and Collaboration


Teacher Games: How to Make Learning Fun and Engaging for Your Students




As a teacher, you know how important it is to keep your students interested and motivated in your lessons. You also know how challenging it can be to find new and effective ways to do so. That's where teacher games come in.




teacher games



Teacher games are activities that you can use in your classroom to make learning more fun and engaging for your students. They can be used for various purposes, such as breaking the ice, reviewing content, building teamwork, stimulating creativity, or challenging thinking. They can also be adapted to different subjects, levels, and contexts.


In this article, you will learn about the types, benefits, tips, and examples of teacher games. You will also discover how you can use them to enhance your teaching practice and improve your students' learning experience.


Types of Teacher Games




There are many types of teacher games that you can use in your classroom. Here are some of the most common ones:


Icebreaker Games




Icebreaker games are games that help you and your students get to know each other better. They are especially useful at the beginning of a new school year or term, or when you have a new group of students. Icebreaker games can help you break the ice, build rapport, establish trust, and create a positive atmosphere in your classroom.


Some examples of icebreaker games are:


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  • Two Truths and a Lie: Each student writes down two true statements and one false statement about themselves. Then they share them with the class or a small group. The others have to guess which one is the lie.



  • Find Someone Who: You prepare a list of statements that describe different characteristics or experiences of your students. For example, "Find someone who has a pet", "Find someone who likes math", or "Find someone who has been to another country". Then you give each student a copy of the list. They have to walk around the classroom and find someone who matches each statement. They can also ask follow-up questions to learn more about their classmates.



  • Bingo: You create a bingo card with different categories or topics related to your subject or theme. For example, if you teach English, you can use categories like "verbs", "adjectives", "nouns", or "synonyms". Then you give each student a copy of the card. They have to fill in each square with a word that belongs to that category. Then you call out random words from the card. The first student who gets a row, column, or diagonal filled shouts "Bingo!"



Review Games




Review games are games that help you reinforce learning and test your students' knowledge. They are especially useful at the end of a unit or lesson, or before a test or exam. Review games can help you review key concepts, terms, facts, or skills. They can also help you assess your students' progress and identify their strengths and weaknesses.


Some examples of review games are:


  • Jeopardy: You create a Jeopardy board with different categories and questions related to your subject or theme. For example, if you teach history, you can use categories like "Dates", "Events", "People", or "Places". Then you divide your class into teams. Each team chooses a category and a question. You reveal the answer and the team has to provide the question. For example, if the answer is "1492", the question is "When did Columbus discover America?". The team gets points for each correct question.



  • Kahoot: Kahoot is an online platform that allows you to create and play quizzes, surveys, or polls with your students. You can choose from a variety of templates or create your own questions. Then you share the quiz with your students using a code or a link. They can join the quiz using their devices. They have to answer the questions as fast and accurately as possible. You can see the results and feedback in real time.



  • Memory: You prepare a set of cards with pairs of words, images, or symbols related to your subject or theme. For example, if you teach math, you can use pairs of equations and solutions, fractions and decimals, or shapes and names. Then you shuffle the cards and place them face down on a table or on the floor. You divide your class into pairs or small groups. Each pair or group takes turns to flip over two cards. If they match, they keep them and score a point. If they don't match, they turn them back over. The pair or group with the most points wins.



Team-Building Games




Team-building games are games that help you foster collaboration and communication among your students. They are especially useful when you want to promote group work, cooperative learning, or project-based learning in your classroom. Team-building games can help you improve your students' social skills, interpersonal relationships, and teamwork abilities.


Some examples of team-building games are:


  • Escape Room: You create an escape room scenario with a theme, a story, a goal, and a series of clues and puzzles related to your subject or theme. For example, if you teach science, you can use a theme like "The Mad Scientist's Lab", a story like "You have been kidnapped by a mad scientist who wants to use you for his experiments. You have to escape before he returns.", a goal like "Find the key to unlock the door.", and clues and puzzles like "Solve this chemical equation.", "Identify this element.", or "Match these organs with their functions.". Then you divide your class into teams. Each team has to work together to solve the clues and puzzles and escape the room within a time limit.



  • Tower Challenge: You give each team a set of materials such as paper, cardboard, tape, scissors, straws, or toothpicks. Then you challenge them to build the tallest tower possible within a time limit. The tower has to be stable and stand on its own. You can also add some criteria or constraints to make it more difficult or interesting. For example, you can limit the number of materials they can use, require them to use a specific shape or color, or ask them to incorporate a certain feature or function in their tower.



  • Pictionary: You prepare a list of words or phrases related to your subject or theme. For example, if you teach art, you can use words or phrases like "Mona Lisa", "Picasso", "abstract", or "perspective". Then you divide your class into teams. Each team chooses one member to be the drawer and the rest are the guessers. The drawer picks a word or phrase from the list and tries to draw it on a board or a paper without using any words or symbols. The guessers have to guess what it is within a time limit. The team gets points for each correct guess.



Creative Games




Creative games are games that help you stimulate your students' imagination and creativity. They are especially useful when you want to encourage your students to express themselves, explore new ideas, or create something original in your classroom. Creative games can help you develop your students' artistic, literary, musical, or inventive talents.


Some examples of creative games are:


  • Story Cubes: Story cubes are dice with different images on each side. You can buy them online or make your own. Then you give each student or group a set of story cubes. They have to roll the dice and use the images to create a story. They can write it down, draw it, or tell it aloud. They can also add their own details, characters, or twists to the story.



Charades: You prepare a list of words or phrases related to your subject or theme. For example, if you teach music, you can use words or phrases like "piano", "Beethoven", "sing", or "rhythm". Then you divide your class into teams. Each team chooses one member to be the actor and the rest are the guessers. The actor picks a word or phrase from the list and tries to act it out without using any words or sounds. The guessers have to guess what it is within a time limit. The


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